Simon Business School
article

Faculty Profile

Gerry J Wedig
Associate Professor of Business Administration
Associate
Phone: 585.273.1647
Office: 3-160J Carol Simon Hall

Bio

Professor Wedig has consulted to numerous medical organizations including hospitals, HMO’s, physician groups, pharmaceutical firms and consulting firms on issues of health care finance. Prior to joining the Simon School, Wedig taught at Boston University’s School of Management, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

Teaching Interests

Wedig teaches courses in organizational economics, statistics, managerial economics, health care economics, as well as the corporate finance and governance of health care organizations.

Research Interests

Professor Wedig’s research interests are focused in the areas of health care economics and finance and organizational economics more generally. In the field of health care finance, he has studied investment, corporate financial behavior, mergers and acquisitions and governance of health care and nonprofit entities. In the field of health care economics, he has studied the the incentive effects of payment systems on costs, insurance coverage and charity care. He has also studied the effects of report cards and public disclosure on consumer behavior. His work in organizational economics has focused on the causes and consequences of horizontal integration (chaining) among nursing homes. Professor Wedig's current research focuses on the determinants of private sector fees in local health care markets, specialization in hospital chains and models of corporate finance and free cash flow determination in commercial nonprofit entities.

Professional History

Associate Professor of Business Administration
University of Rochester Simon School of Business, Rochester NY
2002 -
Associate
Health Systems Innovation Network LLC
1997 -
Associate Professor
Indiana University, Bloomington IN
1996 - 2002
Assistant Professor
Univeristy of Pennsylvania, Wharton, Philadelphia PA
1989 - 1996
Assistant Professor
Boston University, Boston MA
1987 - 1988
Senior Research Associate
Health Economics Research Inc
1983 - 1988

Education

Harvard University - 1987
Ph D
Economics
Washington University - 1981
BA
Economics

Publications

2013
Ownership, Branding and Multiple Audience Concerns: Evidence from Nursing Homes
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: Academy of Management Proceedings
Volume: 2013
Issue: 1
2013
Clustering, Agency Costs and Operating Efficiency: Evidence from Nursing Homes
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: Management Science/Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences
Volume: Vol. 59
Issue: No. 3
2011
Ownership, Branding and Multiple Audience Concerns: Evidence from Nursing Homes
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: Simon School Working Paper No. FR 11-26
2010
Board composition and nonprofit conduct: Evidence from hospitals
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization
Volume: 76
Issue: 2
2004
Board Composition and Private Inurement in Nonprofit Organisations: Evidence from Hospitals
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: Manuscript (University of Rochester)
2003
Board structure and executive compensation in nonprofit organizations: Evidence from hospitals
Contribution Type: Journal Article, Academic Journal
Journal/Publisher/Proceedings Publisher: William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Rochester

Current Research Programs

Effects of Tort Reform on Nursing Home Quality
We (Wedig and Lu) have made significant progress on a companion paper to MALPRACTICE LAWS AND INCENTIVES TO SHIELD ASSETS: EVIDENCE FROM NURSING HOMES. This paper studies the effects of torts law on quality inputs and production in nursing homes. There is a classic liability literature that predicts that product/service quality will fall in some cases where liability is reduced. The major contribution of this paper is considering how organizational economics affects the quality-liability relation. For example, torts liability affects organizational form and, in turn, different organization forms a) respond to liability reductions in different degrees; and b) produce quality with differing levels of efficiency. As a result, it is possible that reductions in tort liability may actually promote quality by promoting the more efficient organizational form and vice versa. A key part of the empirical methodology is correcting for selection bias (organizational form is endogenous) in a panel data set up. Given the possibility that the selection error is serially correlated, a simple Heckman correction is not sufficient and other corrections are needed. We employ techniques suggested in (2) publications by Wooldridge and obtain bootstrapped standard errors. To date we have established that, tort reform, causes nursing homes to reduce key inputs (such as registered nursing hours) and, equally important, that large-chain affiliated nursing homes make greater reductions in inputs than non-affiliated homes. We also establish, consistent with our earlier work, that tort reform encourages the entry of large chains into reform states. Our remaining work on this paper will focus on the effects of changing inputs on quality and a full simulation of the effects of tort reform on quality.
Free Cash Flow in Nonprofit Organizations
I develop a criterion for sufficient free cash flow (FCF) in "sustainable" commercial nonprofit organizations. Calibration of the measure requires specific adjustments for tax-exempt financing. The measure is expected to vary less than comparable measures in otherwise identical for-profit organizations. Measurements and tests of hypotheses are performed in a large sample of hospitals.
Hospital Chaining and Specialization
We examine the determinants of specialization among hospitals belonging to a common chain. We posit two effects that may influence specialization among chain members: a) a cannibalization effect; and b) a travel cost effect. We investigate the role of geography in these effect.
Strategic Pricing and Competitive Procurement in the Physician Services Market
The strategic interaction between public (e.g., Medicare) and private insurers is poorly understood, especially within the physician services market. In this paper we propose and test a model of this interaction.
Vertical Integration and Medical Prices
I examine the relationship between hospital prices, physician services prices and vertical integration between physicians and hospitals.
Go to the top of the page
Get more information about Simon
Apply to Simon